Articles

What is BIM?

 

In our previous article, we described BIM, or Building Information Modeling, as a 3D method of creating coordination drawings. BIM allows more visibility and accuracy in design—including conflict identification—and the ability to create what is, essentially, a digital representation of a completed building.

While BIM’s up-front resource demands and higher costs mean it’s most appropriate when used on complex projects and settings, it is worth exploring the concept further to determine whether your project(s) might benefit from BIM.

Coordination Drawings: What Do They Mean to You?

Coordination Drawings: What Do They Mean to You?

 

The construction industry continues to evolve unlike at any other time since the Industrial Revolution. Communication systems, GPS, robotic total stations, LiDAR, computer software, and their integration into one another have all become common, with additional advances on the horizon such as augmented reality (AR). All have the potential to make it faster, safer, and less expensive to install studs, steel, duct, conduit, pipe, and just about anything else that needs to go into a 21st century building.

Coordination Drawings: What Do They Mean To You?

The construction industry is going through changes unlike any it has seen since the dawn of diesel and electricity. Some of these changes include communication systems, GPS, robotic total stations, lasers, computers, software, and their integration into one another. With acronyms abound (LEED, BIM, CAD, GPS, AIA, OSHA, etc.), there are many organizations and technologies that are interested in making it faster, safer, and less expensive to install studs, steel, duct, conduit, pipe, and just about anything else that needs to go into a 21st Century building.